About
Responders will try to accomplish the uncommon task of blending a weblog with the field of Emergency Management. Currently, after much searching, I believe that I am almost alone in this endeavor. If anyone else knows of a weblog whose topic is exclusively emergency management, please email me below, and I will add the link.


About Me
I am 27 years old and the proud happily married father of a wonderful son. I am also a graduate student at Jacksonville State University in Alabama just entering the realm of Emergency Management. I am pursuing a Master's Degree in Public Administration with an emphasis in Emergency management at this time.


Archives:
Here are past postings

Contact Me:
Email me.



Blogs:
Microcontent News
Homeland Security Weblog

Goverment Links:
FEMA
Disaster Help Portal
FEMA's Tornado Information
FEMA's Hurricane Information
US Geological Survey
Federal Bureau of Investigation
Office of Homeland Security

University Links:
School of Hazard Research
Mailing Lists about Disaster
Disaster Grads Mailing List
Disasters By Design (Book)
Holistic Disaster Recovery (Book)
Excellent Real Time Seismic Links
Jacksonville State University

VOADS:
Voluntary Agencies in Disaster
American Red Cross

Legal Links:
Findlaw - Legal Services
The Federal Register
Code of Federal Regulations
Recent Supreme Court Decisions
Older Supreme Court Decisions
Selected Supreme Court Cases
SARA Title III Overview
SARA TITLE III Text
Emergency Authorities & Directives
FEMA's Legal Room
CERCLA Superfund Act 1980
National Enviromental Policy Act
EMTLA Act
Article on Posse Comitatus Act
Article 2 on Posse Comitatus Act
Full Text Posse Comitatus Act
Homeland Security and Posse Comitatus
OSHA Hazardous Waste Act
FEMA's State and Local Guide
Thomas: Legislative Information
Flood Control Act of 1936
Stafford Act
Disaster Mitigation Act 2000
National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Act
National Flood Insurance Program
Coastal Barrier Resources Act

Other Links:
Each State's OEM
Terrorism.Com
International Emergency Management Association
National Governor's Association
National Fire Protection Association
CIA

Webrings & Guestbook:
I love to blog

<< x BlogxPhiles x >>



Credits:
Web Design
Blogger

Site Meter views


Responders: Blogging Emergency Management
January 11, 2003

Should local Emergency Management officials be required to keep office hours? Here is an article highlighting controversy over this in the state of Tennessee.

Saturday, January 11, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .


How has my view of Emergency Management changed, since I began my degree program?

When I began studying Emergency management, I took a terrorism course. That gave me a narrow focused view with the law enforcement and response management aspect of field. Then I took a general introductory class and a class on Disaster Response. These classes gave me a broader view of the All-Hazards perspective, the history and emergence of a profession, an introduction to the technical aspects of the field, and most importantly the instructors in these two courses strived to select materials that would keep a human face on both the responders, and the victims of the disaster. Sociological implications to everything were always discussed, and I began to see that all the groups involved in EM are centered on the victim. Different groups help the victims in different ways. The process produces a synergism between various agencies.

Emergency management seems to be all about “How can the synergy of the all-hazards process be streamlined?” How can redundancy, and the 'administrative process' be best streamlined for the benefit of those that we respond to in a time of need. Time and time again agencies involved in Emergency Management have restructured their plans, mission statements, and their very core to improve this efficiency. Under the guise of government, the process is not quick or painless, but it is that slow gradual progression that will drive us to work towards perfection.

Some difficulty, I believe, will remain. One such problem is the trouble that ensues when academia tries to disseminate information in a way that practitioners will absorb. Many practitioners are dedicated professionals, but have little time to wade through scholarly material. Scholarly material is presented in such a way that fellow academics can benefit, but as far as a vital source of knowledge for the lay-practitioner leave much to be desired.

Since my first course, I have a greater feel for the total process of Emergency Management. I no longer see it as a response. I see it as an on-going effort pre, during, and post disaster. The body of knowledge for the field will continue to increase, and there will be much pressure to disseminate this knowledge quickly, fluidly and effortlessly to those that need it most.

Saturday, January 11, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .

January 10, 2003

What would be one of the worst disasters in US history?

The answer would be a sizeable New Madrid Seismic Zone event. A large earthquake along this zone would leave tens of thousands homeless, and potentially leave many dead and injured in it's wake, along with damages that could potentially reach hundreds of billions of dollars. Some good news recently came though. A US Geological Survey Employee lowered the risk for a major quake along the zone from a 90% chance in the next 50 years. The new risk estimate is 7% to 10% for the next 50 years. There is still a 20% to 45% chance for a moderate earthquake registering a 6.0 or less. The article can be found here.

Friday, January 10, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .

January 09, 2003

I just realized. . . and other updates.

My weblog has been mentioned on David's Homeland Security Weblog. I appreciate the mention, and please do visit his excellent weblog.

Also, thank you all for bearing with me other night while I changed my blog's template. The old template simply would not work with Netscape/Gecko powered browsers, and I imagine that alot of Linux browsers were not working as well. I am fairly proficient with html, but I did not have the skill to figure out what was wrong with the previous template. Also, give me a few more weeks, and I plan on upgrading my site to a paid listing, meaning no more banners.

Thursday, January 09, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .

January 08, 2003

Schools across Arkansas recieve safe room grants.The safe room grants are part of a mitigation project in Arkansas funded by the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management and FEMA.

Wednesday, January 08, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .


FEMA won't immediately change as it is merged into the Department of Homeland Security. The Stafford Act remains intact. . . but some worry how immigrant communities affected by disaster will react to services offered under the umbrella of 'Homeland Security'. The effect remains to be seen.

Wednesday, January 08, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .

January 07, 2003

Cars offer better protection in tornados than mobile homes. Researchers give recommendations in the article.

Tuesday, January 07, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .


New Years Rung in by Storms across Southern US. At least one death occured in Louisiana when a tree fell across a car. Mobile homes were destroyed in Florida.

Tuesday, January 07, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .


FEMA director to resign. Director Joe Allbaugh says in a prepared statement,"I have been a longtime advocate for the Dept. of Homeland Security and now that it is a reality and the president has a great team in place, I feel I can move on to my next challenge." Allbaugh started his career with FEMA managing an 8.9 magnitude earthquake in Washington last year. Since then he has oversaw over 80 disasters.

Allbaugh angered Iowa residents in Davenport for his opinions on thier lack of a floodwall.

Tuesday, January 07, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .


The studies are still not clear about what, if any, the health effects are from the dust of the World Trade Center. 99% of the dust is in the 10 Micron range, and is easily expelled by the body. However, the remaining 1% of the dust represents tons of material which some researchers believe is a substantial health risk.

Tuesday, January 07, 2003 + posted by: T

. . .

TB, 2002